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Why I Love Social Media, But Not as Much as Fred Durst

Jun 3, 2013   //   by astahr   //   Work Samples  //  Comments Off on Why I Love Social Media, But Not as Much as Fred Durst

922826_10200480281222239_1938383012_nI want to start off this blog by saying that I rarely, if ever, blog for myself. I’m always blogging for my pet sitting business, my movie blog, The Arland Group clients or for personal clients for whom I ghostwrite. I’m just not a “put my personal thoughts on ‘paper’” type of girl. But, today I have something really important to say that I wanted memorialized digitally and not just in my brain as a memory—I love social media because it contributed to the singlemost most important moment of my life.

 

When I was in high school and the phone would ring, we had no idea who was on the other end. We didn’t have call waiting; we had an answering machine and got busy signals. Full disclosure—my friend Kelly and I had an index card in my truck with secret “road trip” numbers of guys’ houses we liked. So, if we were around other people, we could simply say a number and we’d both know who we wanted to go drive by that night. Stalkerish? Of course! But we didn’t have Twitter or Facebook to stalk via social media. Admit it; we’ve all looked up someone virtually. And yes, I still listened to music on tape.

 

I finally graduated to CDs in college, and Limp Bizkit’s Significant Other was the first and only CD I ever lined up outside at midnight for. I’ll never forget my Vintage Vinyl purchase the night of June 22 and running to that same truck to blast out what was and still is my favorite album of all-time. My obsession had begun with Three Dollar Billz Ya’ll, but with Significant Other, it was solidified—Fred Durst was my one and only. No one could ever top his look, his voice and oh, those tattoos.

 

Fast-forward to my first job out of college. Still no Facebook or Twitter (now I’m really dating myself). Electronic newsletters and e-mail blasts were becoming more prevalent, but the job I do now didn’t even exist in the mid-2000s. Social media not only led to the best moment of my life, it saved my career.

 

I stayed true to Limp throughout the years, going to the Family Values tour, and even supporting bands such as Korn, Staind and Puddle of Mudd, just knowing they had the Fred stamp of approval. Two years ago, Limp finally announced another tour. Many said they were washed up. I couldn’t have cared less. And then, Fred canceled the tour, stating that he wanted to play smaller venues. I honestly thought I’d never see them play again. But, you gotta have Faith. (Pun intended.)

 

And then they announced they were coming to Pops June 1, 2013. I found this out via an IM Facebook message from my friend Nicole—something that would’ve never happened a few years ago. And, in an odd turn of events, I happened to have recently hung out with the owner of Pops. This new friendship of course had became official on Facebook just a few weeks prior. I’m Facebook friends with a lot of people. I never in a million years thought this one would make my biggest dream come true.

 

The night of the show, Mark, the Pops owner, IM’d me to call him ASAP. The Sprint tower was down, and I couldn’t even make a phone call. But, I could IM. I had to IM him on my phone through the Facebook app to get the information that Limp was doing a meet-and-greet. None of these things would’ve happened without the power of social media. I would have missed my chance.

 

And then, 14 years almost to the day of buying that life-changing CD, I met Fred Durst (and Wes Borland was there too, ha). While standing in line I thought about what I was going to say. What do you say to the one person you’ve only dreamed of meeting, whom you’ve had an almost life-long obsession for, whose music is the soundtrack to your life, who is your idol?

 

I could only think of one thing: “I’ve loved you for 15 years.” And, in typical rock star fashion and that deep, amazing voice, Fred said, “Well, where have I been?” It was the perfect answer for the perfect moment. Thank you, thank you, thank you.

 

 

 

 

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